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Prostate Cancer Symptoms – Benefits of Early Diagnosis

In recent years the life expectancy of prostate cancer sufferers has dramatically increased, primarily thanks to the introduction of early detection programs and greater public awareness allied with overall healthier lifestyles.

Cancer of the prostate is typically a slow progressing cancer and symptoms often do not arise for many years. If the cancer is caught at an early stage, there might be no noticeable symptoms.  Some men, however, will experience symptoms that could indicate the presence of prostate cancer. These might include:

?A need for frequent urination, particularly at night
?Difficulty starting urination
?Weak or interrupted urine flow
?Pain or a burning sensation during urination
?Difficulty in obtaining an erection
?Pain during ejaculation
?Blood in the urine or in semen
?Recurring pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips, or upper thighs

Sometimes the first symptoms will be lower back, hip or pelvic pain caused by cancer which has already spread.

It is important to be aware that the symptoms of both benign enlargement of the prostate gland (i.e. non-cancerous) and malignant tumours (cancer) are similar and might include any of the following symptoms:

?Difficulty starting urination
?Frequent urination, particularly at night
?Pain during urination
?Blood in the urine

Also, men over 50 years of age often have an enlarged prostate gland due to the non-cancerous condition of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or hypertrophy.

Therefore if you notice any of the above symptoms it is important that you see your doctor and have them investigated. But note that most enlargements of the prostate are not due to cancer and can regularly be dealt with quite effectively.

EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF PROSTATE CANCER

Prostate cancer can often be discovered at an early stage by testing the amount of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the blood. Prostate cancer can also be detected early by your doctor performing a digital rectal examination (DRE). Since the prostate gland is situated close to the rectum, a doctor can physically detect if there are any cancerous signs in your prostate.

Unfortunately the PSA and DRE tests are not totally accurate and conclusive. This can lead to anxiety and confusion, or even to a false sense of security. So important things to consider are your age, your general health and your lifestyle. If you are young and develop prostate cancer, if not caught early enough, it could shorten your life. If however you are older or in poor health, then prostate cancer might never become a serious problem due to its slow-growing nature.

The American Cancer Society recommends that men commence having the prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test and digital rectal examination (DRE) annually from the age of 50. Those at higher risk, such as African Americans and those with close relatives who developed prostate cancer at an early age are recommended to commence testing at 45.

The prognosis for prostate cancer sufferers has improved dramatically in recent years. In the past twenty years the overall survival rate for all stages of prostate cancer has increased from 67% to 97%. Thus more men are living significantly longer after diagnosis. In all likelihood this is due to early detection programs, increased public awareness, particularly of prostate cancer symptoms, and the adoption of healthier lifestyles.

Men’s Guide To Prostate Problems

Discover the main prostate problems and symptoms

The prostate is an important segment of the male reproductive system. It is a land that is located in the lower abdominal cavity, just below the bladder, in front of the rectum and behind the pubic bone. It partially surrounds the urethra. The urethra is the channel that carries urine to the penis from the bladder and it runs right through the prostate. A healthy prostate is about the size of a walnut, weighs approximately 1 ounce and is shaped similar to a donut.
Symptoms Of Prostate Problems
Enlargement of the prostate is called benign prostate hypertrophy, or BPH. While this growth is usually considered a nuisance, if a man experiences problems with burning, or difficult urination at any time, the prudent course of action is consulting a urologist.

Other symptoms may be:

* A feeling of having to push out urine

* A sensation that the bladder is not emptying

* Increased urinating, especially at night

* Intermittent starting and stopping of the urinary stream

After a diagnosis of BPH, many men will just continue to live with the symptoms and subsequent discomfort. It is not a life threatening condition, and there are treatments. In some cases surgery might be considered if the enlargement is significant.

Ignoring BPH can be extremely dangerous and lead to other disease such as kidney infections or damage as the urine can back up into the kidneys because of the blockage of an enlarged prostate. There can also be an occurrence of bladder infections.

There is a huge difference between BPH and prostate cancer. BPH is a normal part of aging. Prostate cancer is a condition where prostate cells grow exponentially and out of control. These cells create tumors that may spread to any part of the body.

Numerous health organizations report that 1 in 6 men will experience prostate cancer. However, if the condition is diagnosed early, approximately 99% of
them will survive. The key is early detection.

Are Frequent Trips To The Bathroom Interrupting Your Sleep? An Enlarged Prostate Could Be To Blame

As men age, it’s not uncommon that they find they make more frequent trips to the bathroom-especially in the middle of the night. For most men, this inconvenience is often made worse by the need to push or strain while urinating. Some even encounter pain or burning while urinating.

While the majority of men over age 60 experience these symptoms, most are not aware of what causes them. Symptoms such as these may be signs of an enlarged prostate, one of the most common urological disorders affecting men over the age of 60. In fact, 60 percent of men over the age of 60 and up to 80 percent of men over the age of 80 have an enlarged prostate.

An enlarged prostate, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is not life threatening. It is not a form of prostate cancer, nor does it lead to prostate cancer. However, as many men know, it can cause significant discomfort, inconvenience and awkwardness. BPH symptoms differ depending on the severity of the condition. The most common symptoms include:

  • Waking at night to urinate
  • Frequent need to urinate (sometimes every two hours or less)
  • Pain or burning during urination
  • Repeated, sudden or uncontrollable urge to urinate
  • Pushing or straining to begin urination
  • Feeling like the bladder does not empty during urination
  • Dribbling after urination

As a man ages, the chance of developing BPH increases. This is because of growth patterns associated with the prostate. After a male reaches the age of 40, a second round of prostate growth often occurs as a natural part of the aging process.

The prostate is a gland located just below the bladder whose main function is to produce fluid for semen. As it expands, it can squeeze and place pressure on the urethra, like a clamp on a garden hose, thus constricting urinary flow. As pressure builds and the “clamp” tightens, the result can be some of the commonly perceived BPH symptoms.

Although there is no known cure for BPH, there are medications and procedures available to reduce the symptoms. These range from prescription oral medications and surgical procedures to minimally invasive, office-based procedures that can provide rapid symptom relief.

What every man should know about the 3 most common troubles of the pesky prostate gland

Next time you see your father, your uncle, or any older gentleman over age 60 or so, ask them about their prostate. If you know the guy well enough, and he feels comfortable enough around you (some would say too comfortable), he will surely share a whole litany of the common prostate problems that are troubling him, or have troubled him, or will trouble him in the near future. That’s because an enlarged prostate, benign prostatic hypertrophy, and even prostate cancer can be in the cards for every man past a certain age.

It’s the scary but true fact of getting old as a man. For instance, every man should know that prostate cancer is one of the most common prostate problems out there. It tops the list of cancers that afflict men, happening in nearly as many men, roughly speaking, as breast cancer in women. Prostate cancer doesn’t get the press that breast cancer does, however, probably because most men would rather not speak about what’s happening down there.

The second thing most men don’t, but should know is exactly what that prostate is. A prostate is actually part of a man’s sexual organs. Located just below the bladder in a man, wrapped around the urethra, the prostate is about the size of a walnut. Its main job in the birds-and-bees scheme of things is to add fluid to your sperm during ejaculation.

And most of the time, men don’t even realize they have a prostate because it’s a hidden internal organ, but all men find out quickly what and where their prostate is when they suffer a common prostate problem.

For instance, all men should know that prostate issues aren’t just for older men. Men under 50 can get prostatitis, or an extremely painful infection of their prostate. This is a swelling of the prostate that can cause fever, a burning sensation during urination, and fatigue.

And all men over 50 should be aware of their number one most common prostate problem, which is an enlarged prostate, or benign prostatic hypertrophy. This benign, or nonfatal condition, is actually far more common in older men than prostate cancer, which should give some relief to older men when they know it.

Men should all be aware of the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, such as leaking and dribbling during urination, a weak urine stream, trouble getting started with urination, and even small amounts of blood in the urine.

And though benign prostatic hypertrophy is more common than prostate cancer, men should be aware that the two can go hand in hand. It’s not always the case, and many men with an enlarged prostate will never develop into cancer. But it’s good to keep your eyes out for both, because they can have similar symptoms.